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Nakajima twin-boom fighter (real WW2 project) by Bispro Nakajima twin-boom fighter (real WW2 project) by Bispro
The aircraft depicted here is not my creation at all. It is a genuine World War II project salvaged from the Nakajima vaults (probably never even submitted to the Japanese military) that recently surfaced on the web in blueprint form. Unfortunately the original plan was horribly warped in the photo that was posted... Using various methods I've developed over time I redrew the plan entirely, trying to stay as faithful to the original as possible. Unless we can ever have access to the original document properly scanned, this is for now the best depiction available anywhere of this nearly 70-year-old project... Enjoy!

© Stéphane Beaumort / AviaDesign 2013
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:iconlordomegaz:
LordOmegaZ Featured By Owner May 29, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
turbo prop engine?

(that's both spinning opposite each other right?)

doesn't that produce seriously more speed and stability?
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:iconbispro:
Bispro Featured By Owner May 29, 2014
Contra-rotating propellers, yes, but not turboprops. The Japanese didn't have that technology yet in 1944-45 (nobody did, actually, it took a few more years).
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:iconlordomegaz:
LordOmegaZ Featured By Owner May 29, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
(oh) .w.;
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:iconashimbabbar:
ashimbabbar Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
do we know when this project was made ? That is, can we tell whether it was inspired by the P-38 or developed independently ?
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:iconbispro:
Bispro Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2013
Inspired by the P-38? There were many twin-boom designs all over the world... I don't think the P-38 alone would have been an inspiration.
I believe this project is from circa 1944, but I'm not quite certain.
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:iconashimbabbar:
ashimbabbar Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2013
ah, I hadn't know the twin-boom design had been that frequent. Considering the highly successful record of the P-38 against japanese planes once the USAF pilots managed to use its diving speed and heavy armament correctly, I had assumed the Japanese would have considered copying it
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:iconbispro:
Bispro Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2013
I'm not saying it didn't have any impact, just that the twin-boom configuration had already been used on several aircraft, built and projected. Also, here it is motivated by the fact that the aircraft had to be a pusher, so that the nose could be used to full advantage for cannons/guns.
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:iconashimbabbar:
ashimbabbar Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2013
considering the time of the project and this business of using the nose for seemingly important weaponry, don't you think it probably was projected to shoot down Flying Fortresses ?
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:iconbispro:
Bispro Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2014
That's a sound possibility, though by the time of war's end the "Super" Fortresses were in full swing.
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:iconusszumwalt:
USSZumwalt Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
Looks more like a light bomber than a fighter.  Although I will admit, it does resemble the P-61 and the P-38
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:iconbispro:
Bispro Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2013
Well, it is a fighter (no space for bombs and five cannons in the nose!).
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:iconsomerandomminion:
SomeRandomMinion Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
Sleek and sexy...I like it!

Y'think this design has potential for a modern stunt/racing aircraft? I'm no expert, but those counter-rotating pushers look like they could out out wicked speed, and keep the plane stable quite nicely.
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:iconbispro:
Bispro Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2014
I'm not sure I made it clear enough but this was a genuine Japanese design, not my invention.

Many of the late war Japanese designs (like the German ones, too) had huge potential to give Allied forces nightmares. Fortunately the state of these countries' industries and their finances didn't allow for all these projects to become reality... At least we can recreate them for fun in art forms, it doesn't harm anyone and actually puts smiles on people's faces!
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:iconsomerandomminion:
SomeRandomMinion Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2014
Oh, I knew it was genuine--I was just complimenting on the design of the thing, that's all. Maybe *I* should have been more clear on that. ^^;
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:iconbispro:
Bispro Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2014
No problem! ;)
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:icontheotterpony:
TheOtterPony Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
This looks a lot like Swedish Saab 21 fighter en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saab_21 (without the contra-rotating propellers) though I have no idea how it performed. Swedes converted some to jet powered.
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:iconsomerandomminion:
SomeRandomMinion Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
Good eye! :)
You like planes?
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:icontheotterpony:
TheOtterPony Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
Oh yes. I have flown on this baby few times: fav.me/d27m5p5 :)
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:iconsomerandomminion:
SomeRandomMinion Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
Huh, never knew prop airliners were still around.
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:icontheotterpony:
TheOtterPony Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
Well, that is used for tour flights, it is not an actual airline, just painted like that. Its home airfield is near where I live.

Many airliners use modern turbo-props, while they cannot match the speed or range of jets, they are cheaper and more fuel-efficient
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:iconbaron-engel:
Baron-Engel Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Do you know if it was single engine spinning the counter-rotating props, or two separate powerplants?
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:iconbispro:
Bispro Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2013
I don't unfortunately but I can ask the Japanese person who shared the picture with me if he can decipher that much...
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:iconbaron-engel:
Baron-Engel Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
If you find out I'd love to know. Thanks for post the 3 views.
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